South Africa

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Republic of South Africa

Republic of South Africa
 

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  • Country Profile
    country profile
    Location South African continent
    Capital Pretoria
    Population 43,997,828 (June 2007)
    Area 1,219,912㎢(5.5 times of the Korean peninsula)
    Race composition Black(77%), White(10%), Mixed(9%), Asian(3%) and others
    Religion Christian(66%), Catholic(9%) and others
    Form of government Republic system
    Language English, African, Zulu
    Currency Rand (R)
    Independence Day May 31, 1910
    Date of diplomatic relationship established Dec. 1, 1992
    Military attache establishment Aug. 2000 in Republic of South Africa, in Korea(not established)
    • Republic of South Africa
    • Republic of South Africa
    • Republic of South Africa
  • Key Roles

    Key Roles during the War

    The Republic of South Africa is located on the southern tip of the African continent. The Republic of South Africa used to be very supportive of any kind of UN activities, so that when the Korean War broke out they issued a statement in support of the UN Security Council Resolution on July 1, 1950. In matters of supporting methods, they discussed the matters with the US, got approval of their plan of support from the Congress, and finally decided to dispatch a fighter squadron. The Squadron departed Durban Port on September 4, 1950, and after 40 days of voyage they arrived in Yokohama, Japan, on November 5, 1950.

    The Republic of South Africa dispatched air force only. The role of South African 2nd Fighter Squadron was mainly aviation support and interdiction missions as one of the squadrons making up the USAF’s 18th Fighter Bomber Wing. For their mission, they used 16 F-51D Mustangs supplied from the US.

    The first operational sortie was flown to northern side of the Cheongchun River in the western forward area. It was a time when the UN forces were retreating southward, and the squadron’s objective was to strike enemy’s assembly areas and field supply installations. They had unfortunate accidents right after they began their mission. Two of their combat planes had crashes during landing mainly because of the poor conditions of the landing strips. Afterwards, the South African forces successfully carried out their interdiction mission by bombing railroads, bridges, overhead bridges, tunnels, and railway switchyards which were spread all over North Korea.

    Participation History

    Participation History
    Unit Participation Period Note
    South African 2nd
    Fighter Squadron
    Sept. 1950 to Oct. 1953 Assigned to the 18th Combat Flying Battalion (Nov. 1950)

    Casualty Statistics

    Casualty Statistics
    Total KIA WIA MIA POW
    43

    34

    -

    - 9
  • Key Battles

    U.N. Forces' Christmas Full Scale Offensive Operation Support (1950. 11. 2~12. 2)

    Ceremony for the unit awarded with the U.S. Presidential Medal
    Battalion’s First
    Contingent boarding C-47 to move

    The Republic of South Africa Combat Flight Squadron made sorties from the Pyongyang base to the northern Cheongcheon River during this period and performed air patrol mission over the Korea and Manchuria borderline and the saturate operation of enemy's rear side.

    Strangle Operation (1951. 8. 18~12. 31)

    Ceremony for the unit awarded with the U.S. Presidential Medal
    Republic of South Africa
    Air Force Mustangs stationed
    in the Youido Advance Air Base

    As the battle line was deadlocked since the opening of the cease-fire talk, the Communist seized this opportunity and began rearranging the battle line by strengthening their positions and moving supplies and troops to the battle zone. Therefore, the U.N. Air Force (air power of Naval Force and Air Force) began behind the saturate operation on military facilities and important traffic points in North Korea from Aug. 1, 1951. The Republic of South Africa Air Force participated in this operation and bombed railroads and bridges in mid and western North Korea and Communist's vehicles heading south.

    Saturate Operation (1952. 2. 25~6. 15)

    Ceremony for the unit awarded with the U.S. Presidential Medal
    South African mechanics busy
    in performing aircraft maintenance work

    As Communist's attack power was strengthened by mobilizing troops and supplies to the battle zone despite of the strangle operation, the U.N. Forces in early 1952 planned to increase artillery attacks on railroads and bridges in key locations for day and night and carry out air patrol. The U.N. Air Force selected 4 areas in Kunwu-ri - Huicheon, Suncheon - Sinseongchen, Sinanju - Namjidong, Pyongyang - Sariwon - Namcheonjeom as key target areas. The Republic of South Africa Air Force participated in this operation, and both sides suffered loss in some occasions by carrying out air battle with MiG-15 in the sky above Jeongju - Kunwu-ri.

    Pressure Operation (1952. 6. 23~8. 31)

    Ceremony for the unit awarded with the U.S. Presidential Medal
    South African mechanics busy
    in performing aircraft maintenance work

    As the strength of Communist increased despite of the strangle operation and the saturate operation by the U.N. Forces from Aug. 1951, the U.N. Air Force that tried to achieve air domination planned intensive attacks on industrial facilities including hydraulic power plant, ammunition factories, camps for troops and supply storage. The Republic of South Africa Air Force also participated in this operation and bombed the Bujeon Lake power plant, the Jangjin Lake power plant, the Tungsten mine in Pyongyang and Gilju and the chemical plant in Hamheung. The Republic of South Africa Air Force Battalion made 2,405 sorties in total since participating in the Korean War.

    After the cease-fire agreement, the Republic of South Africa Air Force Battalion transferred F-86 fighter planes to the U.S. Bombing Brigade and left in Oct. 1953.